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Neurogenesis in the adult rat brain after intermittent hypoxia
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Neurogenesis in the adult rat brain after intermittent hypoxia

Intermittent hypoxia has been found to prevent brain injury and to have a protective role in the CNS. To address the possible causes of this phenomenon, we made an investigative effort to find out whether intermittent hypoxia affects neurogenesis in the adult rat brain by examining the newly divided cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and dentate gyrus (DG). The adult rats were treated with 3000 and 5000 m high altitude 4 h per day for 2 weeks consecutively. 5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine-5-monophosphate (BrdU) immunocytochemistry demonstrated that the BrdU-labeled cells in the SVZ and DG increased after 3000 and 5000 m intermittent hypoxia. The number of BrdU-labeled cells in the SVZ returned to normal level 4 weeks following intermittent hypoxia. However, the BrdU-labeled cells in the DG had a twofold increase 4 weeks subsequent to intermittent hypoxia. From these data, we conclude that intermittent hypoxia facilitates the proliferation of neural stem cells in situ, and that the newly divided cells in the SVZ and DG react differently to hypoxia. We are convinced by these findings that the proliferation of neural stem cells in SVZ and DG may contribute to adaptive changes following intermittent hypoxia.

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Year: 2005

Ling-ling Zhu, Tong Zhao, Hai-sheng Li, Huiqing Zhao, Li-ying Wu, Ai-shi Ding, Wen-hong Fan, Ming Fan

Source: Brain Research